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100604 Manifesten 145.jpg
I shared this meal on my birthday June 4, 2010..http://bit.ly/hoff64.Each night 12 people dine in/on a sculptural construction by Robert Storey that plays with ideas of scale - the chairs are designed for giants and the table comes down from the ceiling. Artist Caroline Hobkinson has conceived the menu, which consists of a medievally-inspired banquet. Apparently, there's magic porridge, cheeses raining from the sky, fish jumping from the water to land at one's feet and freshly baked bread roles suspended in mid-air. It sounds incredible! So that's food and booze and artwork that'll be utterly magical - what's not to like?In addition, performances curated by Ian Giles are taking place on Arnold Circus (which is apparently 100 years old this year) and diners also get to take home editioned works by Trolley Gallery artists Boo Saville and Henry Hudson and a limited edition napkin by Hobkinson. See what I mean - amazing, right? Intrigued, I caught up with Trolley Gallery's Co-Director Hannah Watson and the mind behind the menu, Caroline Hobkinson (who once floated 700 meringues through the Barbican). Hannah explains that the concept stems from a whole range of different points of inspiration. Having dinner at artist Robert Storey's house in Shoreditch - he'd transformed it into a French bistro, complete with French magazines in the loo - and going on one of Caroline's gastronomic art tours of the area, Broken Biscuits, got Hannah a-thinking: "pop-up restaurants are so popular in London at the moment, but I actually wanted do something really special in the gallery itself. We have a huge oven in the gallery and pots and pans hanging up. People are always asking if we use it and we don't really, so this was perfect time to see it in action." "As a gallery," Hannah continues, "we always do dinners when we open a show, and usually the artist is involved in some way, from doing special invitations to the food itself. For Henry Hudson's Hogarth-inspired show we created a Hoga